Publications

Publication: Neuropsychopharmacology

Rafa Romero-Garcia, Roxanne W. Hook, Jeggan Tiego, Richard A. I. Bethlehem, Ian M. Goodyer, Peter B. Jones, Ray Dolan, Jon E. Grant, Edward T. Bullmore, Murat Yücel & Samuel R. Chamberlain

12 September 2020


Summary

Impulsivity refers to behaviours that are inappropriate, risky, unduly hasty, and that lead to untoward outcomes. By contrast, compulsivity refers to repetitive, perseverative actions that are excessive and inappropriate to a given situation.

For example, an individual with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may manifest impulsive problems such as making a statement they regret to a colleague; or jumping a red light; whereas an individual with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may repeatedly (i.e. compulsively) check the front door is locked, for hours per occasion.

It is well known that impulsive and compulsive problems often occur together in the same individual, but very little is known about processes in the brain that may contribute to this. To address this, in this study supported by the NIHR Cambridge BRC researchers studied brain structure and impulsive-compulsive problems in young adults, and the relationship between them.

They found that most of the occurrence of impulsive and compulsive problems could be explained by difficulty regulating urges and habits, known as ‘disinhibition’. Disinhibition was related to changes in the structure of the brain, especially in regions important for top-down control such as the frontal lobe.

The study identified a new brain-based vulnerability marker contributing to impulsive and compulsive problems. Unlike previous research, the findings go beyond traditional psychiatric diagnostic boundaries, by examining a comprehensive range of behaviors, rather than only one disorder studied in isolation.

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Publication: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

Emanuele F.Osimo, Benjamin I.Perry, Rudolf N.Cardinal, Mary-EllenLynall, Jonathan Lewis, Arti Kudchadkar, Graham K.Murray, Jesus Perez, Peter B. Jones, Golam M.Khandaker

09 October 2020


Summary:

A study with early intervention mental health service found that sixty percent of people cared for in their first episode of psychosis recovered well.

The research team used a research database to review blood markers and health outcomes for service users, in a longitudinal study of anonymous patient records between January 2013 and November 2019.

Researchers found that around sixty percent of people with first episode psychosis recovered well enough to be discharged to their GP. Several blood markers were consistently higher or lower in other people who required long term specialist psychiatric care. Read the full press story.

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Publication: Nature Communications

Varun Warrier, David M. Greenberg, Elizabeth Weir  Clara Buckingham, Paula Smith, Meng-Chuan Lai,  Carrie Allison, Simon Baron-Cohen

7 August 2020


Summary:

Transgender and gender-diverse individuals are more likely to be autistic and report higher autistic traits

Researchers reviewed over 600,000 people and used five datasets where participants provided information such as gender identity and if they received a diagnosis of autism or other psychiatric conditions such as depression or schizophrenia. Participants also completed a measure of autistic traits.

Researchers found that transgender and gender-diverse adult individuals were between three and six times more likely to indicate that they were diagnosed as autistic compared to cisgender individuals. The study used data from adults who said they had received an autism diagnosis, however, it is likely there are more individuals on the autistic spectrum who are undiagnosed.

This research will help improve access to mental health care and support for transgender and gender-diverse individuals. Read the full news story.

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Publication: Molecular Psychiatry

Varun Warrier, Simon Baron-Cohen

29 October 2019


Summary:

People with a higher genetic likelihood of autism are more likely to report higher childhood maltreatment, self-harm and suicidal thoughts. Following on from a previous study, researchers looked at the genetic likelihood for autism in 100,000 people. They found those with a higher number of genetic varients associated with autism were more likely to report maltreatment and self-harm.

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Publication: Frontiers in Behavioural Neuroscience

George Savulich, Emily Thorp, Thomas Piercy, Katie A Peterson, John D Pickard, Barbara J Sahakian.

21 Jan 2019


Summary:

A new ‘brain training’ game designed by researchers at the University of Cambridge improves users’ concentration, according to new research published today. The scientists behind the venture say this could provide a welcome antidote to the daily distractions that we face in a busy world.

A team from the Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute at the University of Cambridge, has developed and tested ‘Decoder’, a new game that is aimed at helping users improve their attention and concentration. The game is based on the team’s own research and has been evaluated scientifically.

In a study published in the journal Frontiers in Behavioural Neuroscience Professor Sahakian and colleague Dr George Savulich have demonstrated that playing Decoder on an iPad for eight hours over one month improves attention and concentration. This form of attention activates a frontal-parietal network in the brain. Read the full story here

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Publication: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

Meiser-Stedman R, McKinnon A, Dixon C, Boyle A, Smith P, & Dalgleish T

25 March 2019

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Publication: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

Hull L, Mandy W, Lai MC, Baron-Cohen S, Allison C, Smith P, Petrides KV

25 October 2018

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Publication: Neurobiology of Aging

Mak E, Padilla C, Annus T, Wilson LR, Hong YT, Fryer TD, Coles JP, Aigbirhio FI, Menon DK, Nestor PJ, Zaman SH.

August 2018

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Publication: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry

Chamberlain SR, Tiego J, Fontenelle LF, Hook R, Parkes L, Segrave R, Hauser TU, Dolan RJ, Goodyer IM, Bullmore E, Grant JE, Yucel M.

6 March 2019

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Publication: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

Raha-Chowdhury R, Henderson JW, Raha AA, Vuono R, Bickerton A, Jones E, Fincham R, Allinson K, Holland A, Zaman SH.

7 May 2019

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Publication: Mit Press Journals

Anna O Ermakova, Nimrod Gileadi, Franziska Knolle, Azucena Justicia Diaz, Rachel Anderson, Paul C Fletcher, Michael Moutoussis, Graham K Murray.

1 February 2019

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Publication: Molecular Autism

Sun X, Allison C, Wei L, Matthews FE, Auyeung B, Wu YY, Griffiths S, Zhang J, Baron-Cohen S, Brayne C.

28 February 2019

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Publication: Brain

Surendranathan A, Su L, Mak E, Passamonti L, Hong YT, Arnold R, et al.

6 November 2018

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Publication: Neuropsychopharmacology

Skandali N, Rowe JB, Voon V, Deakin JB, Cardinal RN, Cormack F, et al.

26 September 2018

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Publication: Neuroimage

Cury C, Durrleman S, Cash DM, Lorenzi M, Nicholas JM, Bocchetta M, et al.

6 December 2018

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Publication: Psychological Medicine

Fernandez-Egea E, Worbe Y, Bernardo M, Robbins TW.

December 2018

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Publication: The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease

Mezquida G, Fernandez-Egea E, Treen D, Mane A, Berge D, Savulich G, et al.

Novermber 2018

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Publication: Schizophrenia Research

Treen D, Savulich G, Mezquida G, Garcia-Portilla MP, Toll A, Garcia-Rizo C, et al.

February 2019

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Publication: Nature Communications

Young AL, Marinescu RV, Oxtoby NP, Bocchetta M, Yong K, Firth NC, et al.

15 October 2018

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Publication: Molecular Psychiatry

Koriath C, Kenny J, Adamson G, Druyeh R, Taylor W, Beck J, et al.

2 October 2018

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Publication: Molecular Psychiatry

Lombardo MV, Auyeung B, Pramparo T, Quartier A, Courraud J, Holt RJ, et al.

13 August 2018

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Publication: Psychological Medicine

Savulich G, Menon DK, Stamatakis EA, Pickard JD, Sahakian BJ.

11 April 2018

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Publication: PLoS One

Holt R, Upadhyay J, Smith P, Allison C, Baron-Cohen S, Chakrabarti B.

27 July 2018

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Publication: Behavior Research Methods

Lassalle A, Pigat D, O’Reilly H, Berggen S, Fridenson-Hayo S, Tal S, et al.

30 April 2018

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Publication: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease,

Moylett S, Price A, Cardinal RN, Aarsland D, Mueller C, Stewart R, O’Brien JT.

28 November 2018

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Publication: Frontiers in Psychiatry

Savulich G, Jeanes H, Rossides N, Kaur S, Zacharia A, Robbins TW, et al.

21 November 2018

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Publication: Nature

Baland Jalal, Annette Brühl, Claire O’Callaghan, Thomas Piercy, Rudolf N. Cardinal, Vilayanur S. Ramachandran and Barbara J. Sahakian

23 October 2018


Summary:

A ‘brain training’ app could help people who suffer from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) manage their symptoms, which may typically include excessive handwashing and contamination fears.

One of the most common types of OCD, affecting up to 46% of OCD patients, is characterised by severe contamination fears and excessive washing behaviour. Excessive washing can be harmful as sometimes OCD patients use spirits, surface cleansers or even bleach to clean their hands. The behaviours can have a serious impact on people’s lives, their mental health, their relationships and their ability to hold down jobs.

Cambridge researchers developed a new treatment to help people with contamination fears and excessive washing. The intervention, which can be delivered through a smartphone app, involves patients watching videos of themselves washing their hands or touching fake contaminated surfaces. Read the full story here

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Publication: Molecular Autism

Cassidy S, Bradley L, Shaw R, Baron-Cohen S.

31 July 2018

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Publication: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

Mc Ardle R, Morris R, Hickey A, Del Din S, Koychev I, Gunn RN, et al.

10 April 2018

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Publication: Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring.

Mak E, Bethlehem RA, Romero-Garcia R, Cervenka S, Rittman T, Gabel S, Surendranathan A, Bevan-Jones RW, Passamonti L, Rodríguez PV, Su L.

1 January 2018

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Publication: Molecular Neurobiology

Galindo L, Moreno E, Lopez-Armenta F, Guinart D, Cuenca-Royo A, Izquierdo-Serra M, et al.

2 January 2018

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Publication: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Whitaker, K.J., Vértes, P.E., Romero-Garcia, R., Váša, F., Moutoussis, M., Prabhu, G., Weiskopf, N., Callaghan, M.F., Wagstyl, K., Rittman, T., Tait, R., Suckling, J., Ooi, C., Inkster, B., Fonagy, P., Dolan, R., Goodyer, I.M., Jones, P.B., the NSPN Consortium, Bullmore, E.T.

25 July 2016

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Publication: Molecular Psychiatry

Kappelmann, N., Lewis, G., Dantzer, R., Jones, P.B. and Khandaker, G.M., 2016

18 October 2016

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Publication: Science

Ersche, K.D., Gillan, C.M., Jones, P.S., Williams, G.B., Ward, L.H., Luijten, M., de Wit, S., Sahakian, B.J., Bullmore, E.T. and Robbins, T.W

17 June 2016

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