Publications

The latest list of publications from the Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre with a brief summary. 

If you are publishing research which has had funding and / or support from the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre, please complete the attached form

Publication: Kidney International

Lia Bally, Philipp Gubler, Hood Thabit, Sara Hartnell, Yue Ruan, Malgorzata E. Wilinska, Mark L. Evans, Mariam Semmo, Bruno Vogt, Anthony P. Coll, Christoph Stettler, Roman Hovorka
20 March 2019

Summary:
In a post hoc analysis of a randomised controlled clinical trial, researchers compared the efficacy of fully automated closed-loop insulin delivery vs. usual care in patients undergoing hemodialysis while in hospital.
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Publication: Immunity

Tomas Castro-Dopico, Thomas W. Dennison, John R. Ferdinand, Rebeccah J. Mathews, Aaron Fleming, Dean Clift, Benjamin J. Stewart, Chenzhi Jing, Konstantina Strongili, Larisa I. Labzin, Edward J.M. Monk, Kourosh Saeb-Parsy, Clare E. Bryant, Simon Clare, Miles Parkes, Menna R. Clatworthy

12 March 2019

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Summary:

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is due to aberrant responses of the gut mucosa to the resident microbiome. The identification of which immune cells are involved in IBD will lead to identification of novel therapeutic targets.

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Publication: JAMA

Walker GJ, Harrison JW, Heap GA, Voskuil MD, Andersen V, Anderson CA, Ananthakrishnan AN, Barrett JC, Beaugerie L, Bewshea CM, Cole AT, Cummings FR, Daly MJ, Ellul P, Fedorak RN, Festen EAM, Florin TH, Gaya DR, Halfvarson J, Hart AL, Heerasing NM, Hendy P, Irving PM, Jones SE, Koskela J, Lindsay JO, Mansfield JC, McGovern D, Parkes M, Pollok RCG, Ramakrishnan S, Rampton DS, Rivas MA, Russell RK, Schultz M, Sebastian S, Seksik P, Singh A, So K, Sokol H, Subramaniam K, Todd A, Annese V, Weersma RK, Xavier R, Ward R, Weedon MN, Goodhand JR, Kennedy NA, Ahmad T; IBD Pharmacogenetics Study Group.

26 February 2019

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Publication: The Lancet

Kennedy NA, Heap GA, Green HD, Hamilton B, Bewshea C, Walker GJ, Thomas A, Nice R, Perry MH, Bouri S, Chanchlani N, Heerasing NM, Hendy P, Lin S, Gaya DR, Cummings JRF, Selinger CP, Lees CW, Hart AL, Parkes M, Sebastian S, Mansfield JC, Irving PM, Lindsay J, Russell RK, McDonald TJ, McGovern D, Goodhand JR, Ahmad T; UK Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pharmacogenetics Study Group.

26 February 2019

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Publication: BMJ Open

Thomas MG, Bayliss C, Bond S, Dowling F, Galea J, Jairath V, Lamb C, Probert C, Timperley-Preece E, Watson A, Whitehead L, Williams JG, Parkes M, Kaser A, Raine T.

15 February 2019

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Publication: Journal of Neurology

Nye CJS, Wagner A, Kousin-Ezewu O, Jones JL, Coles AJ.

4 February 2019

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Publication: American Journal of Gastroenterology

Forrest EH, Atkinson SR, Richardson P, Masson S, Ryder S, Thursz MR, Allison M.

2019 Jan;114(1):175-176.

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Publication: Frontiers in Immunology

Jawaher Alsughayyir, Manu Chhabra, M. Saeed Qureshi, Mekhola Mallik, Jason M. Ali, Ivonne Gamper, Ellen L. Moseley, Sarah Peacock, Vasilis Kosmoliaptsis, Martin J. Goddard, Michelle A. Linterman, Reza Motallebzadeh, Gavin J. Pettigrew

22 January 2019


Summary:

Humoral alloimmunity is now recognized as a major determinant of transplant outcome. MHC glycoprotein is considered a typical T-dependent antigen, but the nature of the T cell alloresponse that underpins alloantibody generation remains poorly understood. This paper examines how the relative frequencies of alloantigen-specific B cells and helper CD4 T cells influence the humoral alloimmune response and how this relates to antibody-mediated rejection (AMR).

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Publication: Frontiers in Immunology

Manu Chhabra, Jawaher Alsughayyir, M. Saeed Qureshi, Mekhola Mallik, Jason M. Ali, Ivonne Gamper, Ellen L. Moseley, Sarah Peacock, Vasilis Kosmoliaptsis, Martin J. Goddard, Michelle A. Linterman, Reza Motallebzadeh and Gavin J. Pettigrew

23 January 2019


Summary:

Different profiles of alloantibody responses are observed in the clinic, with those that persist, often despite targeted treatment, associated with poorer long-term transplant outcomes. Although such responses would suggest an underlying germinal center (GC) response, the relationship to cellular events within the allospecific B cell population is unclear. Here we examine the contribution of germinal center (GC) humoral alloimmunity to chronic antibody mediated rejection (AMR)…

This work is composed of two parts, of which this is Part II. Please read also Part I: Alsughayyir et al., 2019.

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Publication: Frontiers in Behavioural Neuroscience

George Savulich, Emily Thorp, Thomas Piercy, Katie A Peterson, John D Pickard, Barbara J Sahakian.

21 Jan 2019


Summary:

A new ‘brain training’ game designed by researchers at the University of Cambridge improves users’ concentration, according to new research published today. The scientists behind the venture say this could provide a welcome antidote to the daily distractions that we face in a busy world.

A team from the Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute at the University of Cambridge, has developed and tested ‘Decoder’, a new game that is aimed at helping users improve their attention and concentration. The game is based on the team’s own research and has been evaluated scientifically.

In a study published in the journal Frontiers in Behavioural Neuroscience Professor Sahakian and colleague Dr George Savulich have demonstrated that playing Decoder on an iPad for eight hours over one month improves attention and concentration. This form of attention activates a frontal-parietal network in the brain. Read the full story here

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Publication: BMJ Open

John OO AyorindeDominic M Summers, Laura Pankhurst, Emma Laing, Alison J Deary, Karla Hemming, Edward CF Wilson, Victoria Bardsley, Desley A Neil, Gavin J Pettigrew

17 January 2019


Summary:

Most potential kidney transplant donors in the UK are aged over 60 years, yet increasing donor age is associated with poorer graft survival and function. Urgent preimplantation kidney biopsy can identify chronic injury, and may aid selection of better ‘quality’ kidneys from this group. However, the impact of biopsy on transplant numbers remains unproven. The PreImplantation Trial of Histopathology In renal Allografts (PITHIA) study will assess whether the introduction of a national, 24 hours, digital histopathology service increases the number, and improves outcomes, of kidneys transplanted in the UK from older deceased donors.

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Publication: Journal of Hepatology

Rhiannon Taylor, Elisa Allen, James A. Richards, Mingzheng A. Goh, James Neuberger, David Collett, Gavin J. Pettigrew, Liver Advisory Group to NHS Blood and Transplant

11 January 2019


Summary:

This study looks at patients who require a liver transplant to save their lives; this liver can be donated by a person who has died either after their heart has stopped (donation after cardiac death – DCD) or after the brain has been injured and can no longer support life (donation after brainstem death – DCB). We know that livers donated after brainstem death function better than those after cardiac death, but there are not enough of these livers for everyone, so we wished to help patients decide whether it was better for them to accept an early offer of a DCD liver than waiting longer to receive a “better” liver from a DBD donor. We found that patients were more likely to survive if they accepted the offer of a liver transplant as soon as possible (DCD or DBD), especially if their liver disease was very severe.

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