Publications

The latest list of publications from the Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre with a brief summary. 

Publication: Nature Metabolism

Jack L. Martin, Ana S. H. Costa, Anja V. Gruszczyk, Timothy E. Beach, Fay M. Allen, Hiran A. Prag, Elizabeth C. Hinchy, Krishnaa Mahbubani, Mazin Hamed, Laura Tronci, Efterpi Nikitopoulou, Andrew M. James, Thomas Krieg, Alan J. Robinson, Margaret M. Huang, Stuart T. Caldwell, Angela Logan, Laura Pala, Richard C. Hartley, Christian Frezza, Kourosh Saeb-Parsy, Michael P. Murphy

30 September 2019

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Summary:

During retrieval of kidneys for transplant, there is inevitably a period of time when the organ is without blood flow but still warm (warm ischaemia). A human kidney cannot sustain this for long. During warm ischaemia, a metabolite called succinate builds up. When blood flow is restored, then counter-intuitively, the kidney tissue is damaged with the arrival of oxygenated blood. A drug was tested that ameliorates this damage. This research shows how the function and life span of a transplanted organ can be improved.

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Publication: Nature

Bashford-Rogers, R.J.M., Bergamaschi, L., McKinney, E.F., Pombal, D.C., Mescia, F., Lee, J.C., Thomas, D.C., Flint, S.M., Kellam, P., Jayne, D.R.W., Lyons P.A. and Smith, K.G.C.

25 September 2019

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Publication: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Pérez-Vázquez M, Sola Campoy PJ, Ortega A, Bautista V, Monzón S, Ruiz-Carrascoso G, Mingorance J, González-Barberá EM, Gimeno C, Aracil B, Sáez D, Lara N, Fernández S, González-López JJ, Campos J, Kingsley RA, Dougan G, Oteo-Iglesias J; Spanish NDM Study Group .  J Antimicrob Chemother.

3 September 2019

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Publication: Genome Biology

Ellington MJ, Heinz E, Wailan AM, Dorman MJ, de Goffau M, Cain AK, Henson SP, Gleadall N, Boinett CJ, Dougan G, Brown NM, Woodford N, Parkhill J, Török ME, Peacock SJ, Thomson NR.

2 September 2019

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Publication: The Lancet Global Health

Stephen Kaptoge, Lisa Pennells, Dirk De Bacquer, Marie Therese Cooney, Maryam Kavousi, Oyere Onuma, Mark Woodward, Goodarz Danaei, Gregory Roth, Shanthi Mendis, Ian Graham, Cherian Varghese, Majid Ezzati, Rod Jackson, John Danesh & Emanuele Di Angelantonio

1 September 2019


Summary:

Cambridge-led researchers have updated World Health Organisation (WHO) cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction charts to aid efforts to reduce the burden of CVD, one of the most common non-communicable diseases world-wide and responsible for an estimated 17.8 million deaths in 2017.

The research was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre, WHO, British Heart Foundation (BHF), BHF Cambridge Centre for Research Excellence and UK Medical Research Council.

The revised risk models will help particularly middle- to low-income countries in their efforts to prevent and control CVD. Full story here

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Publication: EMBO Molecular Medicine

Blohmke CJ, Muller J, Gibani MM, Dobinson H, Shrestha S, Perinparajah S, Jin C, Hughes H, Blackwell L, Dongol S, Karkey A, Schreiber F, Pickard D, Basnyat B, Dougan G, Baker S, Pollard AJ, Darton TC.

30 August 2019

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Publication: Nature Genetics

Geoff Macintyre, Teodora E. Goranova, Dilrini De Silva, Darren Ennis, Anna M. Piskorz, Matthew Eldridge, Daoud Sie, Liz-Anne Lewsley, Aishah Hanif, Cheryl Wilson, Suzanne Dowson, Rosalind M. Glasspool, Michelle Lockley, Elly Brockbank, Ana Montes, Axel Walther, Sudha Sundar, Richard Edmondson, Geoff D. Hall, Andrew Clamp, Charlie Gourley, Marcia Hall, Christina Fotopoulou, Hani Gabra, James Paul, Anna Supernat, David Millan, Aoisha Hoyle, Gareth Bryson, Craig Nourse, Laura Mincarelli, Luis Navarro Sanchez, Bauke Ylstra, Mercedes Jimenez-Linan, Luiza Moore, Oliver Hofmann, Florian Markowetz, Iain A. McNeish and James D. Brenton

13 August 2018


Summary:

Researchers have found distinct patterns of DNA rearrangement that are linked to patient outcomes.

In this study of ovarian cancer samples from over 500 women, the research team harnessed big data processing techniques to look for broad patterns in the genetic readouts from ovarian cancer cells.

Rather than focusing on the detail of each individual mistake in the DNA, they designed powerful computer algorithms to scan the genetic data, finding seven distinct patterns.

They showed that each pattern, or “signature”, represented a different mechanism of DNA mutation. Taken together, these signatures were able to make sense of the chaos seen in ovarian cancer genomes. Read the full story here

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Publication: Nature Genetics

Kumar N, Browne HP, Viciani E, Forster SC, Clare S, Harcourt K, Stares MD, Dougan G, Fairley DJ, Roberts P, Pirmohamed M, Clokie MRJ, Jensen MBF, Hargreaves KR, Ip M, Wieler LH, Seyboldt C, Norén T, Riley TV, Kuijper EJ, Wren BW, Lawley TD.

12 August 2019

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Publication: Nature Biotechnology

Johannes Bargehr, Lay Ping Ong, Maria Colzani, Hongorzul Davaapil, Peter Hofsteen, Shiv Bhandari, Laure Gambardella, Nicolas Le Novère, Dharini Iyer, Fotios Sampaziotis, Florian Weinberger, Alessandro Bertero, Andrea Leonard, William G. Bernard, Amy Martinson, Nichola Figg, Michael Regnier, Martin R. Bennett, Charles E. Murry & Sanjay Sinha

2 August 2019


Summary:

Transplanting an area of damaged tissue with a combination of both heart and muscle cells and supportive cells taken from the outer layer of the heart wall, may be able to help the organs recover from the damage caused by a heart attack. Part funded by the BHF and NIHR and supported by the NIHR Cambridge BRC, researchers have used supportive epicardial cells developed from human stem cells to help transplanted heart cells live longer. Full story here

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Publication: Nature

Marcus C. de Goffau, Susanne Lager, Ulla Sovio, Francesca Gaccioli, Emma Cook, Sharon J. Peacock, Julian Parkhill, D. Stephen Charnock-Jones & Gordon C. S. Smith
31 July 2019

Summary:
This paper from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Cambridge presents three key messages: (1) the placenta does not have a microbiome; (2) bacterial infection of the placenta is not a common cause of adverse pregnancy outcome; and (3) the placenta is however a potential site of perinatal acquisition of Streptococcus agalactiae, a major cause of neonatal sepsis.
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Publication: Nature Medicine

Felipe A. Vieira Braga, Gozde Kar, Marijn Berg, Orestes A. Carpaij, Krzysztof Polanski, Lukas M. Simon, Sharon Brouwer, Tomás Gomes, Laura Hesse, Jian Jiang, Eirini S. Fasouli, Mirjana Efremova, Roser Vento-Tormo, Carlos Talavera-López, Marnix R. Jonker, Karen Affleck, Subarna Palit, Paulina M. Strzelecka, Helen V. Firth, Krishnaa T. Mahbubani, Ana Cvejic, Kerstin B. Meyer, Kourosh Saeb-Parsy, Marjan Luinge, Corry-Anke Brandsma, Wim Timens, Ilias Angelidis, Maximilian Strunz, Gerard H. Koppelman, Antoon J. van Oosterhout, Herbert B. Schiller, Fabian J. Theis, Maarten van den Berge, Martijn C. Nawijn, Sarah A. Teichmann

17 June 2019

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Summary:

This research carried out a survey of structural and immune cells in the airways of healthy and asthmatic lungs and identified a novel set of T cells resident in asmatic airways. There is altered communication between immune and structural cells in asthmatic airways and these changes underlie the inflammation in these airways.

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Publication: Pediatric Nephrology

Jack L. Martin, Anja V. Gruszczyk, Timothy E. Beach, Michael P. Murphy, Kourosh Saeb-Parsy 

2 June 2018

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Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major problem in critically unwell children, including ischaemic reperfusion (IR) injury involving mitochondria. This research proposes a variety of novel therapeutic targets as potential treaments of AKI.

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