Publications

The latest list of publications from the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre with a brief summary. 

If you are publishing research which has had funding and / or support from the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre, please complete this form

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Publication: Nature

Duuamene Nyimanu, Richard G. Kay, Petra Sulentic, Rhoda E. Kuc, Philip Ambery, Lutz Jermutus, Frank Reimann, Fiona M. Gribble, Joseph Cheriyan, Janet J. Maguire, Anthony P. Davenport

27 December 2019

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Summary:

An LC-MS method was developed to measure Apelin in human plasma, and demonstrate apelin dosing achieved the correct concentration in volunteers. The extracts were also analysed on an LC-MS system to identify break-down products of the peptide that were produced in the body. The researchers found out that apelin is broken down from both ends of the peptide, but more so from the C-terminal. This information can be used to develop a better peptide that is stabilised against degradation, therefore improving its characteristics as a drug; and apelin-derived peptides may be potential new drugs for cardiovascular disease.

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Publication: Science

Tim H. H. Coorens, Taryn D. Treger, Reem Al-Saadi, Luiza Moore, Maxine G. B., Thomas J. Mitchell, Suzanne Tugnait, Christine Thevanesan, Matthew D. Young, Thomas R. W. Oliver, Minou Oostveen, Grace Collord, Patrick S. Tarpey, Alex Cagan, Yvette Hooks, Mark Brougham, Ben C. Reynolds, Giuseppe Barone, John Anderson, Mette Jorgensen, G. A. Amos Burke, Johannes Visser, James C. Nicholson, Naima Smeulders, Imran Mushtaq, Grant D. Stewart, Peter J. Campbell, David C. Wedge, Iñigo Martincorena, Dyanne Rampling, Liz Hook, Anne Y. Warren, Nicholas Coleman, Tanzina Chowdhury, Neil Sebire, Jarno Drost, Kourosh Saeb-Parsy, Michael R. Stratton, Karin Straathof, Kathy Pritchard-Jones, Sam Behjati

6 December 2019

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Summary:

Wilms tumour is the most common type of kidney cancer in childhood but it was not previously known how it arose in children’s kidneys. This research found out that both pediatric and adult kidney cancer arise in a similar way, from premalignant clonal expansions.

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Publication: QJM: An International Journal of Medicine

R El-Damanawi, M Lee, T Harris, L B Cowley, S Bond, H Pavey, R N Sandford, I B Wilkinson, F E Karet Frankl, T F Hiemstra

30 October 2019
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Summary:

Vasopressin is a hormone that is made by the body to conserve water in states of dehydration. In Polycystic Kidney disease (PKD) this hormone accelerates cyst growth and kidney damage, making it the fourth leading global cause of kidney failure.  High water intake reduces blood levels of vasopressin, and may slow cyst growth and disease progression similarly to currently available vasopressin blockers.  However, the feasibility, safety and sustaintability of this therapeutic strategy remains unknown.

In this randomised controlled trial, patients with PKD were randomised to either high water intake (HW) or Ad libitum water intake (AW) over an 8-week period.  The primary outcome was to determine if the HW group could maintain dilute urine, and the AW group could keep their urine more concentrated over an 8-week follow up period.  We used a self-management strategy and smartphone applications to promote compliance.

Researchers found that high water intake is feasible, sustainable and safe, and can be started early in the disease course prior to the onset of irreversible kidney damage; while the use of smartphone applications to record home-monitoring of urine dipstick tests promoted adherence, driving a difference in urine results between the groups. A definitive global randomised controlled trial of high versus normal water intake is possible and will be the next stage of this work.

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Publication: Molecular Psychiatry

Varun Warrier, Simon Baron-Cohen

29 October 2019


Summary:

People with a higher genetic likelihood of autism are more likely to report higher childhood maltreatment, self-harm and suicidal thoughts. Following on from a previous study, researchers looked at the genetic likelihood for autism in 100,000 people. They found those with a higher number of genetic varients associated with autism were more likely to report maltreatment and self-harm.

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Publication: Nature

Henry Lee-Six, Sigurgeir Olafsson, Peter Ellis, Robert J. Osborne, Mathijs A. Sanders, Luiza Moore, Nikitas Georgakopoulos, Franco Torrente, Ayesha Noorani, Martin Goddard, Philip Robinson, Tim H. H. Coorens, Laura O’Neill, Christopher Alder, Jingwei Wang, Rebecca C. Fitzgerald, Matthias Zilbauer, Nicholas Coleman, Kourosh Saeb-Parsy, Inigo Martincorena, Peter J. Campbell & Michael R. Stratton

23 October 2019

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This was a study of early changes in human colorectal tissue that could lead to adenomas/carconomas. These are rare outcomes even after a substantially increased mutational burden has been placed on the tissue, but it is important to study the earliest stages of colorectal carcinogenesis.

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Publication: Nature Communications

Andrea I. Luppi1, Michael M. Craig, Ioannis Pappas, Paola Finoia, Guy B. Williams, Judith Allanson, John D. Pickard, Adrian M. Owen, Lorina Naci, David K. Menon & Emmanuel A. Stamatakis 

10 October 2019


Summary:

Researchers used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to scan the brains of healthy volunteers and brain injured patients who had been awake but no signs of awareness or in a minimally conscious state, to understand what happens to the brain when consciousness is lost.

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Publication: Nature Metabolism

Jack L. Martin, Ana S. H. Costa, Anja V. Gruszczyk, Timothy E. Beach, Fay M. Allen, Hiran A. Prag, Elizabeth C. Hinchy, Krishnaa Mahbubani, Mazin Hamed, Laura Tronci, Efterpi Nikitopoulou, Andrew M. James, Thomas Krieg, Alan J. Robinson, Margaret M. Huang, Stuart T. Caldwell, Angela Logan, Laura Pala, Richard C. Hartley, Christian Frezza, Kourosh Saeb-Parsy, Michael P. Murphy

30 September 2019

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Summary:

During retrieval of kidneys for transplant, there is inevitably a period of time when the organ is without blood flow but still warm (warm ischaemia). A human kidney cannot sustain this for long. During warm ischaemia, a metabolite called succinate builds up. When blood flow is restored, then counter-intuitively, the kidney tissue is damaged with the arrival of oxygenated blood. A drug was tested that ameliorates this damage. This research shows how the function and life span of a transplanted organ can be improved.

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Publication: Nature

Bashford-Rogers, R.J.M., Bergamaschi, L., McKinney, E.F., Pombal, D.C., Mescia, F., Lee, J.C., Thomas, D.C., Flint, S.M., Kellam, P., Jayne, D.R.W., Lyons P.A. and Smith, K.G.C.

25 September 2019

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Publication: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Pérez-Vázquez M, Sola Campoy PJ, Ortega A, Bautista V, Monzón S, Ruiz-Carrascoso G, Mingorance J, González-Barberá EM, Gimeno C, Aracil B, Sáez D, Lara N, Fernández S, González-López JJ, Campos J, Kingsley RA, Dougan G, Oteo-Iglesias J; Spanish NDM Study Group .  J Antimicrob Chemother.

3 September 2019

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Publication: Genome Biology

Ellington MJ, Heinz E, Wailan AM, Dorman MJ, de Goffau M, Cain AK, Henson SP, Gleadall N, Boinett CJ, Dougan G, Brown NM, Woodford N, Parkhill J, Török ME, Peacock SJ, Thomson NR.

2 September 2019

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Publication: The Lancet Global Health

Stephen Kaptoge, Lisa Pennells, Dirk De Bacquer, Marie Therese Cooney, Maryam Kavousi, Oyere Onuma, Mark Woodward, Goodarz Danaei, Gregory Roth, Shanthi Mendis, Ian Graham, Cherian Varghese, Majid Ezzati, Rod Jackson, John Danesh & Emanuele Di Angelantonio

1 September 2019


Summary:

Cambridge-led researchers have updated World Health Organisation (WHO) cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction charts to aid efforts to reduce the burden of CVD, one of the most common non-communicable diseases world-wide and responsible for an estimated 17.8 million deaths in 2017.

The research was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre, WHO, British Heart Foundation (BHF), BHF Cambridge Centre for Research Excellence and UK Medical Research Council.

The revised risk models will help particularly middle- to low-income countries in their efforts to prevent and control CVD. Full story here

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Publication: EMBO Molecular Medicine

Blohmke CJ, Muller J, Gibani MM, Dobinson H, Shrestha S, Perinparajah S, Jin C, Hughes H, Blackwell L, Dongol S, Karkey A, Schreiber F, Pickard D, Basnyat B, Dougan G, Baker S, Pollard AJ, Darton TC.

30 August 2019

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