Publications

The latest list of publications from the Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre with a brief summary. 

Publication: Nature Genetics

Mahajan A, Wessel J, Willems SM, Zhao W, Robertson NR, Chu AY, et al.

9 April 2018

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Publication: Journal of the American College of Cardiology

Michael Inouye, Gad Abraham, Christopher P. Nelson, Angela M. Wood, Michael J. Sweeting, Frank Dudbridge, Florence Y. Lai, Stephen Kaptoge, Marta Brozynska, Tingting Wang, Shu Ye, Thomas R. Webb, Martin K. Rutter, Ioanna Tzoulaki,Riyaz S. Patel, Ruth J.F. Loos, Bernard Keavney, Harry Hemingway, John Thompson, Hugh Watkins, Panos Deloukas,Emanuele Di Angelantonio, Adam S. Butterworth, John Danesh, Nilesh J. Samani

8 October 2018


Summary:

Genetic factors have long been known to be major contributors of someone’s risk of developing coronary heart disease – the leading cause of heart attacks. Currently to identify those at risk doctors use scores based on lifestyle and clinical conditions associated with coronary heart disease such as cholesterol level, blood pressure, diabetes and smoking. But these scores are imprecise, age-dependent and miss a large proportion of people who appear ‘healthy’, but will still develop the disease.

The ‘big-data’ GRS technique takes into account 1.7 million genetic variants in a person’s DNA to calculate their underlying genetic risk for coronary heart disease.

The team analysed genomic data of nearly half a million people from the UK Biobank research project aged between 40-69 years. This included over 22,000 people who had coronary heart disease.

The GRS was better at predicting someone’s risk of developing heart disease than each of the classic risk factors for coronary heart disease alone. The ability of the GRS to predict coronary heart disease was also largely independent of these known risk factors. This showed that the genes which increase the risk of coronary heart disease don’t simply work by elevating blood pressure or cholesterol, for example.

People with a genomic risk score in the top 20 per cent of the population were over four-times more likely to develop coronary heart disease than someone with a genomic risk score in the bottom 20 per cent. Read the full press release

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Publication: Nature Genetics

Malik R, Chauhan G, Traylor M, Sargurupremraj M, Okada Y, Mishra A, et al.

12 March 2018

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Publication: Nature Communications

Iglesias AI, Mishra A, Vitart V, Bykhovskaya Y, Hohn R, Springelkamp H, et al.

14 May 2018

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Publication: Neurology

Tay J, Tuladhar AM, Hollocks MJ, Brookes RL, Tozer DJ, Barrick TR, et al.

12 March 2019

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Publication: Biomaterials

Ng SS, Saeb-Parsy K, Blackford SJI, Segal JM, Serra MP, Horcas-Lopez M, No DY, Mastoridis S, Jassem W, Frank CW, Cho NJ, Nakauchi H, Glenn JS, Rashid ST. Biomaterials.

November 2018

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Publication: Neurology

Traylor M, Tozer DJ, Croall ID, Lisiecka Ford DM, Olorunda AO, Boncoraglio G, et al.

19 February 2019

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Publication: JAMA

Brown JWL, Coles A, Horakova D, Havrdova E, Izquierdo G, Prat A et al.

15 January 2019

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Publication: Nature Communications

Keogh MJ, Wei W, Aryaman J, Walker L, van den Ameele J, Coxhead J, et al.

15 October 2018

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